Eagle Forage Soybeans vs Ag Beans - Full growing season comparison.

I get asked many times each year how well Eagle Forage Soybeans grow in a given area and how do they compare to regular ag soybeans. In 2017, a good friend of Midwest Monster's volunteered his property to do a side-by-side comparison for a full growing season.

This test plot was grown near Lake Elmo, Minnesota, about 15 miles west of St. Paul. We planted Eagle's Wildlife Manager's Mix North for the test plot.

Eagle Forage Soybeans were grown in one plot and in a second plot of equal size about 100 yards away a leading Roundup Ready field soybean (appropriate to the area and growing past growing conditions) was planted. The soybeans were planted on the same day, with the same row/plant spacing.

Planting day was May 28, 2017.

Germination and Early Growth - Eagle Forage Soybeans - Here are some pictures of germination and early growth of the Eagle Forage Soybeans.

Eagle Forage Soybeans - June 10 - 13 days after planting.

Eagle Forage Soybeans - June 15 - 18 days after planting. Excellent growth rate.

Eagle Forage Soybeans - June 22 - 25 days after planting. At this point the Eagle Forage Soybeans have canopied about half the row already.

Comparison Pictures - Eagle Forage Soybeans vs Ag Beans - Here's how the Eagle Forage Soybeans stack up against a conventional ag bean. Both plots were planted on the same day and are within 100 yards of each other, so soil and growing conditions are the same.

June 28 - 30 days after planting

Eagle Forage Soybeans

Conventional Ag Beans

July 9 - 41 days after planting.

Eagle Forage Soybeans

Conventional Ag Beans

July 23 - 55 days after planting.

Eagle Forage Soybeans

Conventional Ag Beans

July 30 - 62 days after planting - Here's some great trail cam pictures to give you a sense of scale.

Eagle Forage Soybeans

Conventional Ag Beans

Late Season Growth - As of August 1, the ag beans had reached their greatest height and size for the season. Deer browsing pressure prevented them from growing any more and as the season progressed, the ag bean plants got smaller and smaller.